Pollinators: Honeybee visiting wildflowers Animals Environment Science & Art 

Pollination: Meet the Pollinators

By Steven Spence Spring is well underway in the northern hemisphere and EH Science is delighted to feature these seasonal photos by contributor, Steven Spence. We’re sure you’ll enjoy them as much as we do! Pollination Currently there is significant concern about the decline in honeybee populations. There are various factors behind the decimation of the hives, but first some fundamental questions: Why do plants require pollination? How important are bees in pollination? Are there alternative pollinators to bees? Pollinators Smell Sex and Candy in the Air Spring is a…

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An employee working at a treadmill desk. (Jaren Wilkey/BYU) Featured Health 

How to Ask Your Boss for a Treadmill Desk

The adverse effects of sedentary office work have given adjustable desks, standing desks, and treadmill desks new attention, but treadmill desks are not everyone’s cup of tea. Now, the latest research from Brigham Young University reveals the impact that treadmill desks can have on job performance. So You Want a Treadmill Desk If you are interested in using a treadmill desk at the office, your greatest challenge may be convincing your boss that it will not have a negative impact on your job performance. Some employers worry that standing or…

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stargazing Astronomy Videos 

Stargazing Across Time: Shelf Life Episode 5

 Stargazing For eons, humanity has been fascinated by the stars. From sundials to telescopes, episode five of the Shelf Life series showcases not only the tools that have been used to observe the sky throughout history but also the stargazing technology of the future. Even though the tools currently in use for observing space are more powerful than ever before, there is still room for improvement. Scientists are working on space-based and land-based telescopes that will capture images of the universe in unparalleled detail. One new device in the planning stages…

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This figure shows how a gorilla and a human to grip and move an object. The dots indicate positions in which the object can be gripped. (Yale University) Biology Engineering 

Better Understanding the Human Grip

The human hand is an evolutionary wonder: 26 percent of the bones in our bodies are in our hands. Now, scientists are coming to better understand the grip and special grasping ability of humans and other primates. In a new study, a research team found that even the oldest known human ancestors may have had precision gripping skills comparable to modern humans. This includes Australopithecus afarensis, a creature that predates the first known stone tools by about a million years. Manual dexterity is traditionally viewed as a key adaptation that…

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Isle Royale Wolves: Only three wolves appear to remain at Isle Royale National Park. (Rolf Peterson) Animals Environment 

Only Three Isle Royale Wolves Remain

Wolves are pack animals, yet on the Isle of Royale National Park (located in Lake Superior) only three wolves remain. Researchers from Michigan Technological University observed the wolves during the annual Winter Study, and the lone trio appears to be all that is left of the nine Isle Royale wolves seen last winter. The park offers outstanding possibilities for research in a remote ecosystem, and the annual report of the Ecological Study of Wolves on Isle Royale, released today, marks the project’s 57th year of observing Isle Royale wolves and…

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Skull of the Olinguito: Shelf Life Episode 4 Animals Biology Videos 

Skull of the Olinguito: Shelf Life Episode 4

The Skull of the Olinguito This video, fourth in the Shelf Life series, reveals how scientists in the field found the skull of a new species and identified it as the elusive olinguito. Thousands of new animal species are discovered every year, some living and some extinct. Researchers regularly make expeditions to the far-flung corners of the globe in search of new species, ranging from the single-celled organisms found in pools of volcanic sulfur (or even in your own stomach), to deep-sea organisms and larger animals like monkeys and birds….

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Brain Health (Illustration courtesy of Dream Designs via freedigitalphotos.net) Biology Health 

Brain Health: Fight Brain Age with Civic Activity

Have you had a “senior moment” today? Do you worry about the onset of Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, and other forms of brain atrophy in old age? These are common concerns. As we age, our brains can shrink, but a new study from John Hopkins University reveals that brain health can be improved with civic-minded activities such as volunteering and teaching. Our brains can do incredible things, such as control robotics such as this mind-controlled robotic arm, or learn to use other tools. Our brains are so amazing that we are even trying to…

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Male and female European green woodpeckers (Steven Spence) Animals Environment 

Yaffle: Meet the European Green Woodpecker

By Steven Spence “Yaffle” was one of the English folk names given to the European green woodpecker (German Grünspecht; Latin Picus viridis) due to its distinctive, laughing call. The European green woodpecker spends most of its time foraging on the ground instead of pecking holes in trees as most other woodpecker species do. The bird primarily eats ants because its tongue is well adapted for this, being 10cm long and sticky (see this short video for a view of the bird’s impressive tongue). This woodpecker’s tongue is so long, in…

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Coelacanth, Shelf Life Episode 3, American Museum of Natural History Video Animals Biology Videos 

Fishing for Facts: Studying the Rare Coelacanth

Meet the Coelacanth Coelacanths (see-la-kanths) are large, ancient fish with arm-like fins and armor-like scales. They can be found in the fossil record through the time of the dinosaurs, but disappear about 70 million years ago. Everyone thought the creature was extinct. Then, in 1938, the coelacanth splashed into the modern world when one was caught in a fishing net off the coast of South Africa. The prehistoric specimen pulled from the fishing net was discovered by Marjorie Courtenay-Latimer, the curator of the East London Museum, located in South Africa….

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Polar Bears: Tasul the polar bear (Oregon Zoo) Animals Biology Environment 

Polar Bears Struggling to Find Food

By Kate S. The polar bear is a fearsome hunter and, when it’s time to eat, there’s nothing it finds more satisfying than a hearty meal of ringed seal. But as the arctic sea ice melts, polar bears have fewer opportunities to hunt their traditional, lipid-rich prey. Among other animals, climate change has been impacting our shellfish supply, California’s pika population, and the lemurs of Madagascar. Now, a team of scientists led by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) found that polar bears, forced onto land by the loss of sea…

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