What Happens When Antarctica Melts? Environment 

What Happens When Antarctica Melts?

By Kate Stone @GotScienceOrg Between December 2001 and February 2002, the Antarctic continent underwent a season of intense melting. Aside from the loss of ice, what really happens when Antarctica melts? New research reveals that the changes range from sped-up microbial food webs to shifting penguin populations. The clash of two climatic cycles, the Southern Annular Mode and the El Niño Southern Oscillation, produced an unusually warm and windy spring season across Antarctica back in 2001–2002. This climate event melted glaciers including the Totten Glacier, thinned lake ice, and caused…

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Lupine Invasions Biology Botany Environment 

Lupine Invasions

By Marie Davey @biophilesblog Roadsides, ditches, and railway lines in Norway are awash with colour every June.  The lupines bloom, and dense swathes of purple, pink, and white blossoms stacked into perfect pillars brighten the countryside. I love the vibrant colours, but I have to stop to remind myself that these are not the friendly wildflowers of my Canadian childhood. Lupinus polyphyllus, the big-leaved lupine, is native to the western United States and Canada, from British Columbia and Alberta south to California and east to Montana, Idaho, and Nevada—but in…

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Book Review: Secrets of the Seas: A Journey into the Heart of the Oceans Book Reviews Oceanography Photos 

Book Review: Secrets of the Seas

Title: Secrets of the Seas: A Journey into the Heart of the Ocean Reviewed by: Steven Spence for GotScience.org, a Science Connected publication Author: Callum Roberts Photographer: Alex Mustard Publisher: Bloomsbury Natural History Publication Date: September 22, 2016 Available: Bloomsbury UK; Amazon Rating: 5 out of 5 Secrets of the Seas: A Journey into the Heart of the Oceans is an extraordinary book. Visiting multiple ocean locations, the author and photographer offer glimpses of marine life diversity that few people ever see firsthand. Why I Enjoyed Secrets of the Seas As…

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Nests, Neurons, and the Evolution of Behavior. How and Why Do Brain Cells Die? Biology Health 

How and Why Do Brain Cells Die?

By Norman Rusin @normanrusin Chaining Proteins May Free Brain Cells from Disease How did the king of Corinth, Sisyphus, outwit the god of death, Thanatos? By using the god’s own chains. When it was Sisyphus’s time to die, Zeus ordered Thanatos to chain Sisyphus up in Tartarus, the kingdom of the dead. King Sisyphus slyly asked Thanatos to demonstrate how the chains worked. As Thanatos was granting him his wish, Sisyphus seized the opportunity and trapped Thanatos in the chains instead. Once the god of death was bound by the…

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Educational Resources, Science Teaching Resources, STEM Resources Education 

Free New Resources for Science Teachers

New resources for science teachers are now available from the GotScience Teachers STEM Education Resource Center! Two e-book science teaching discussion guides and activities are now available for free download from GotScience.org. Click here to get your free e-book. You will be prompted to enter a little information and select free teaching materials for either middle school or high school. Did You Know? Ensuring that all students have access to high-quality learning opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) is a priority of the US Department of Education. In…

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Failed Experiments Move Science Forward Education Health 

Failed Experiments Move Science Forward

A new series for ResearchGate by Katherine Lindemann Article contributed by Michele Heisler Researchers don’t dream of negative studies, but experiments that don’t go as expected and trials that yield negative results are critical for moving science forward. To highlight this important part of the research process, we asked research scientists to speak about their own experiences with “failure.” Our first contributor is Michele Heisler, a health services researcher who develops and tests health system-based interventions. There is a certain moment that every researcher who develops and evaluates health care interventions…

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Mosquito Saliva Protein Fights Dengue Transmission Biology Health 

Mosquito Saliva Protein Fights Dengue Transmission

By Neha Jain @lifesciexplore Dengue, along with other viral diseases such as Chikungunya and Zika, is transmitted through the virus-infected saliva of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Dengue cases have been on the rise worldwide in the past decades—with almost a million cases expected each year—and over half of the world’s population is at risk. In the United States, the states of Hawaii, Florida, and Texas have had outbreaks in the past decade. Mosquito saliva contains over a hundred proteins, some that enhance the transmission of dengue by invading our immune systems, and…

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GotScience Book Review Book Reviews Technology 

Book Review: When We Are No More

Title: When We Are No More: How Digital Memory Is Shaping Our Future Author: Abby Smith Rumsey Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing On sale: March 2016 Best for: 16+ Reviewed by: Norman Rusin for GotScience.org, a Science Connected publication Reviewer’s rating: 3 out of 5 Introduction Imagine a world in which all the knowledge produced and amassed by humankind is finally digitized. One day a natural catastrophe destroys all the servers that are preserving that data. What will the future hold for humankind? Now, imagine a world where human life is no…

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global warming Environment Videos 

Global Warming: What’s Really Warming the Earth?

Dr. Joe Hanson explores the possible causes of global warming in this episode of It’s Okay To Be Smart.   References and Further Reading July 2016 is hottest on record NOAA’s State of the Climate July 2016 Bloomberg’s climate change data viz project Solar activity and temperature show opposite trend Milankovitch cycles (I left out eccentricity because it operates on scales so long that it doesn’t affect short-term climate change) Connecting climate models with actual temperature changes NASA Goddard’s Gavin Schmidt explains the history of the instrumental temperature record Last time…

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DNA Analysis Reveals Four Distinct Giraffe Species Animals Biology 

DNA Analysis Reveals Four Distinct Giraffe Species

By Katherine Lindemann Researchers have long recognized only a single species of giraffe, thought to be made up of several subspecies. However, a research collaboration has now identified four distinct species. Conservation biologist Julian Fennessy of the Giraffe Conservation Foundation, geneticist Axel Janke of the Senckenberg Research Institute, and their colleagues collected and analyzed samples from giraffes across the African continent. Their results appear in the journal Current Biology. ResearchGate: When and why did you start genetically testing giraffes across Africa? Julian Fennessy: When I approached Axel Janke to help…

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