A Better Predictor of Cervical Cancer Health 

A Better Predictor of Cervical Cancer

By Cathy Seiler January is Cervical Health Awareness Month. What do you know about cervical cancer? Probably the only time you think about your cervix is once a year when you get your Pap test (also known as a Pap smear). But maybe you’re not thinking about it enough. How much do you know about what causes cervical cancer? How much do you know about why you get that annual Pap test? And do you know how—or whether—it works? What is cervical cancer and the Pap? Cervical cancer is the fourth most common…

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Frequent Rainstorms Predicted with Climate Change Environment 

Frequent Rainstorms Predicted with Climate Change

By Neha Jain @lifesciexplore If you live in California, you might recall the powerful winter rainstorm of 2014, dubbed the “storm of the decade.” While it offered some respite from the prolonged drought in the region, it dumped several inches of rain—in some Bay Area counties average annual rainfall was doubled—which caused widespread flooding and power outages. Until now such intense rainstorms have been rare. But in the future, Californians may need to clutch their umbrellas and slip on their rain boots more often because such monster rainstorms might become the…

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STEAM: Adding the Art to Science Science & Art 

STEAM: Adding the Art to Science

By Cathy Seiler @cyc55 What comes to mind when you envision science? A scientist looking through a microscope? A pipette slurping up liquid from a tube? A whole bunch of equations on a blackboard? These snapshots often depict science in the news or in movies, but what really brings science alive is the image at the other end of the microscope, the structure of proteins in that test tube, or the physical problem being modeled with those equations. This is where the art comes in. People have been drawing or…

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Spacecraft Could Clean Up Trash Orbiting Earth Astronomy 

Spacecraft Could Clean Up Trash Orbiting Earth

By Katherine Lindemann Human activity in outer space has left behind a lot of trash, from tiny bits of metal to entire satellites no longer in use. This debris poses a danger to new and ongoing missions. Inna Sharf is an aeronautical engineer at McGill University and is working on ways to remove it from orbit. She tells us about two potential cleanup methods she and her colleagues are exploring. For updates, follow the project on ResearchGate. ResearchGate: How much space debris is out there? Inna Sharf: There are an…

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Plant Bacteria Thrive in Wet Weather Biology Botany 

Plant Bacteria Thrive in Wet Weather

By Neha Jain @lifesciexplore Plants need water to grow. But too much water isn’t good for them either. Scientists have found that excessive rain and high humidity levels allow disease-causing bacteria to attack plants by creating a moist environment that makes them more susceptible to bacterial infections. When conditions are right, plants can be infected with bacteria, viruses, and fungi. While scientists and farmers have long known that wet weather and long periods of high humidity can increase the risk of crops getting diseases, the exact mechanisms have so far…

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GotScience Book Review Animals Biology Book Reviews 

Book Review: Wild Sex: The Science Behind Mating in the Animal Kingdom

Title: Wild Sex: The Science Behind Mating in the Animal Kingdom Reviewed by: Kate Stone for GotScience.org, a Science Connected publication Author: Dr. Carin Bondar Publisher: Pegasus Books On sale: Now (September 2016) Best for: 18 and up Reviewer’s rating: 4.5 out of 5 Introduction Sexual reproduction. It provides the genetic diversity that is essential for complex life on Earth. Birds do it; bees do it—every member of the animal kingdom does it, from fruit flies to blue whales. But if you think humans have a tough time dating, try…

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