fire ants Animals Biology 

Inside the World of Fire Ants

In this video, Dr. Joe Hanson and the It’s OK to Be Smart team deliver everything you didn’t realize you wanted to know about fire ants. Special appearance by ant-decapitating flies. Enjoy! GotScience.org translates complex research findings into accessible insights on science, nature, and technology. Help keep GotScience free: Donate or visit our gift shop. For more science news subscribe to our weekly digest.

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Laugh: Marc Kjerland Biology Videos 

Why Do We Laugh?

Laughing is a universal human behavior, one that transcends borders of language and culture. But it’s also REALLY WEIRD. Why do we do it? The answer has less to do with humor than you might think, and more to do withs socializing, bonding, and biology. Laugh Hard, Laugh Often This video from It’s OK to Be Smart and PBS Digital Studios is written and hosted by Dr. Joe Hanson, Ph.D. Special thanks to Dr. Joe for granting permission to publish his videos on GotScience.org. Joe Hanson – Creator/Host/Writer Joe Nicolosi –…

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By Brocken Inaglory - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2141765 Animals Oceanography Videos 

So Many Jellyfish, So Little Time

Dr. Joe gets up close and personal with the jellyfish (jellies) at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. “Jellyfish are mesmerizing and beautiful and I have no idea how they work. So I went behind the scenes at the Monterey Bay Aquarium with my new friend Tommy to learn all about them. I saw some things…” Dr. Joe says. Enjoy! Brought to you by It’s OK to be Smart, PBS Digital Studios, and BBC Earth Big Blue Live. Featured photo courtesy of By Brocken Inaglory – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2141765 GotScience.org translates complex…

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global warming Environment Videos 

Global Warming: What’s Really Warming the Earth?

Dr. Joe Hanson explores the possible causes of global warming in this episode of It’s Okay To Be Smart.   References and Further Reading July 2016 is hottest on record NOAA’s State of the Climate July 2016 Bloomberg’s climate change data viz project Solar activity and temperature show opposite trend Milankovitch cycles (I left out eccentricity because it operates on scales so long that it doesn’t affect short-term climate change) Connecting climate models with actual temperature changes NASA Goddard’s Gavin Schmidt explains the history of the instrumental temperature record Last time…

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