Wood Ants Make Defensive Cocktails Against Microbes Animals Chemistry 

Wood Ants Make Defensive Cocktails Against Microbes

By Neha Jain @lifesciexplore Wood ants are natural mixologists, concocting their own defensive cocktails, a new study finds. They protect themselves from infection by mixing self-produced acid with resin collected from trees to create a potent antimicrobial. “This is an unusual case where insects combine plant defenses with their own chemical defenses to produce a potent antimicrobial substance,” says Michel Chapuisat, of the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, who is the senior author of the study. We sanitize our homes using cleaners such as alcohol and bleach to protect ourselves from…

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Science Literacy Starts with Accessibility Uncategorized 

Science Literacy Starts with Accessibility

By Shayna Keyles Outreach Coordinator Science Connected Science is a broad term that covers numerous disciplines, from paleontology and particle physics to medicine and mechanical engineering. Nutritional recommendations, architectural limitations, and football-throwing specifications are all guided by science—as are birth, death, and everything in between. So where does Science Connected fit in with all that? Science is vast, and for many around the world, it’s a foreign concept. Many factors contribute to its inaccessibility: teaching methods or curricula that are less than ideal; prohibitive expenses of higher learning; difficulties in…

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GotScience Book Review Book Reviews 

Book Review: Bring Back the King

Title: Bring Back the King: The New Science of De-extinction Reviewed by: Steven Spence for GotScience.org, a Science Connected publication Author: Helen Pilcher Publisher: Bloomsbury (Sigma Series) On sale: September 2016 Best for: High school and up Reviewer’s rating: 5 out of 5 Introduction Playing on both T. rex and Elvis Presley in the title and text, Helen Pilcher covers some serious, cutting-edge science in her breezily written book Bring Back the King: The New Science of De-extinction. Readers will be introduced to DNA, cloning, the use of CRISPR (Clustered Regularly…

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Can You Improve Your Running with Physics? Biology Physics 

Can You Improve Your Running with Physics?

By Emily Rhode @riseandsci Running is one of the simplest forms of exercise we can do. It requires no protective gear or fancy equipment. At its core, it just requires force. Runners are constantly searching for clues for how to improve their speed and prevent injury. But until now, there was no easy way to fully assess the way a runner moves. In a new study published in the Journal of Experimental Biology, researchers at Southern Methodist University describe a new method that requires nothing more than a quality camera…

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Which Dinosaur Gave Rise to Tyrannosaurus Rex? Paleontology 

Which Dinosaur Gave Rise to Tyrannosaurus Rex?

By David Blagic Tyrannosaurus rex surely is one of the most well-known dinosaurs of all time. We know nearly everything about it, from its anatomy to its behavior. However, one important question hasn’t yet been answered—who was T. rex’s ancestor? What dinosaur species has the honor to be called “the King’s” grandparent? There are three main contestants: (1) Tarbosaurus bataar, (2) southern-type North American tyrannosaurid, or (3) Daspletosaurus torosus. Tarbosaurus bataar Tarbosaurus is probably the closest relative of Tyrannosaurus discovered so far. The only notable morphological differences between it and…

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Scientists and Social Media Science Policy Technology 

Scientists and Social Media

By Kate Stone @GotScienceOrg Dr. Bill Sullivan is a Showalter Professor of Pharmacology, Toxicology, Microbiology, and Immunology at the Indiana University School of Medicine. That’s an impressive job title, but it’s not his only one. Bill is also a blogger. Social media is an efficient way for research scientists to connect with the public at large. Scientists have tools at their disposal to reach out to millions of people, involve citizen scientists in projects, and collaborate with colleagues. Yet social media use is often stigmatized. Since Bill actively uses social…

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Artificial Intelligence System Wins at Poker Technology 

Artificial Intelligence System Wins at Poker

By Katherine Lindemann Poker isn’t like other games artificial intelligence has mastered, such as chess and go. In poker, each player has different information from the others and, thus, a different perspective on the game. This means poker more closely mirrors the kinds of decisions we make in real life but also presents a huge challenge for AI. Now, an AI system called DeepStack has succeeded in untangling this imperfect information, refining its own strategy to win against professional players at a rate nearly 10 times that of a human…

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Shelf Life Video: Fossils in the Gobi Desert Paleontology Videos 

Shelf Life Video: Fossils in the Gobi Desert

It’s been nearly a century since the Museum began their explorations of Mongolia’s Gobi Desert—a vast and imposing landscape that occupies an unparalleled space in the scientific record. The American Museum of Natural History gives some background on the Gobi Desert expeditions: One of the world’s richest locations for dinosaur, lizard, and mammal fossils, it was discovered in 1993 by a team that included Curators Mark Norell (now Macaulay Curator and Chair of the Division of Paleontology) and Mike Novacek (now Provost of Science at the Museum), and visited by…

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Studying the Dolphin Genome for Human Health Animals Biology Health 

Studying the Dolphin Genome for Human Health

By Kate Stone @GotScienceOrg Humans have long been enamored with dolphins. There is something irresistible about dolphins’ playfulness and agility in the water. We portray them in television and film as heroes saving humans from danger through remarkable feats of strength and tenacity. Some people have reported that dolphins saved them from drowning or shark attacks. Now, dolphins may save humans, thanks to a database full of genetic data. “Dolphins and humans are very, very similar creatures,” says Ben Neely from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). “As…

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Nuisance Flooding May Cost More Than Extreme Storms Environment Science Policy 

Nuisance Flooding May Cost More Than Extreme Storms

By Neha Jain @lifesciexplore Climate change affects us in many ways, particularly those of us living near the coasts, who have to bear the brunt of rising sea levels. We usually focus on preparing for that rare superstorm that everyone is talking out. But researchers find that the seemingly harmless episodes of nuisance flooding that we often overlook are becoming more frequent, thanks to rising sea levels, and can turn out to be more costly in the long term. “These diffuse floods happen multiple times a month or year,” says…

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