Is Climate Change Causing These Moose to Shrink? Biology Environment 

Is Climate Change Causing These Moose to Shrink?

By Emily Rhode @riseandsci The effects of climate change are starting to show themselves in strange and unexpected ways. For the cold-adapted moose of Isle Royale, Michigan, a warming environment could literally be causing them to shrink. According to researchers at Michigan Technological University, the flourishing moose population at the heart of the world’s longest-running predator-prey relationship study is displaying alarming changes that may be most readily explained by environmental pressures. The soon-to-be-released 60-year study of the dynamics between the moose and wolf population of the tiny island in the…

Read More
Bioelectronic “Nose” Sniffs Out Food Spoilage Biology Engineering 

Bioelectronic “Nose” Sniffs Out Food Spoilage

By Emily Rhode @riseandsci One whiff of spoiled meat is usually enough to let us know that we should definitely not eat it. But what about those leftovers that have been in the refrigerator for a few days and still smell ok? We could throw them away out of an abundance of caution, but that becomes an expensive and wasteful practice. Or we could cross our fingers and go ahead and eat them. Something’s rotten According to the EPA, Americans disposed of more than 38 million tons of food waste…

Read More
New Ways to Reduce Antibiotics in Food Animals by 2030. Animals Biology Health 

New Ways to Reduce Antibiotics in Food Animals by 2030

By Neha Jain @lifesciexplore In a new study, researchers in the United States and Europe propose three measures—capping antibiotic use in farm animals, imposing a fee for veterinary use of antibiotics, and limiting meat intake—that, together, can reduce the use of antibiotics in food animals by up to 80 percent by 2030. Antibiotic resistance results from antibiotics overuse Overuse of antibiotics, particularly in animals for food, is the main cause of the spread of resistance whereby antibiotics lose their effectiveness, and infections become untreatable, leading to what many scientists call…

Read More
Ocean Floor Warming Affects Antarctic Seabed Life Biology Environment Oceanography 

Ocean Floor Warming Affects Antarctic Seabed Life

By Neha Jain @lifesciexplore A rise in ocean temperatures by 1°C may not seem like a lot. But researchers were surprised to find nearly doubled growth of some species with just one-degree rise in ocean warming and varied growth responses of assemblages with two degrees of warming, in the most realistic marine warming study conducted in Antarctica to date. These drastic changes in community structure may have huge consequences for the entire ecosystem, as they affect the food chain. “I was not expecting such a visible difference,” said Gail Ashton,…

Read More
Vampires, or People with Blood Disorder? Biology Health 

Vampires, or People with Blood Disorder?

By Michelle Dookwah @mtdookwah Vampires, or People with This Blood Disorder? Autumn is here, and with it comes cooler temperatures, shorter days, and a favorite fall holiday: Halloween. These last two features of the season have more in common than you may have realized. The shorter days of fall mean less daylight in the evening hours, and this might have a significant impact on the day-to-day lives of certain individuals with a particular blood disorder called erythropoietic protoporphyria. Erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP) is a rare genetic disorder that results in hypersensitivity…

Read More
Ongoing Human Evolution Revealed in Data Biology Health 

Ongoing Human Evolution Revealed in Data

By Kate Stone @GotScienceOrg When I was about nine years old, a young schoolmate demanded to know, “If evolution is real, then why isn’t it happening now?” Being nine and not a biologist, I wasn’t prepared to answer this question. And yet, it was a question that I’ve heard echoes of in the years to follow. Now, a research team at Columbia University has conducted a large-scale study of genetic data and revealed how humans are evolving. In a study analyzing the genomes of 210,000 people in the United States…

Read More
The Salamander-Algae Symbiotic Relationship Animals Biology Videos 

Shelf Life Video: The Salamander-Algae Symbiotic Relationship

What happens inside a Salamander egg? How does the embryo interact with its environment? Find out in this video, which is another in the Shelf Life series from the American Museum of Natural History.   Scientists collect Salamander egg masses to investigate the symbiotic relationship between embryos and algae. The two organisms exchange substances that help each other to thrive in their environment. Researchers are increasingly interested in how the microorganisms that are inside and on our bodies interact with us throughout the course of our lives and affect our physiology. GotScience…

Read More
Coral Gardening Effectively Restores Staghorn Corals Biology Environment Oceanography 

Coral Gardening Effectively Restores Staghorn Corals

By Neha Jain @lifesciexplore Staghorn corals (Acropora cervicornis)—a threatened species that resembles deer antlers—are effectively restored by coral gardening, a process that involves cutting coral fragments from healthy, wild donor colonies, rearing the coral fragments in underwater nurseries, and outplanting or reattaching onto degraded reefs, finds a study conducted in the Caribbean. The study demonstrates that current restoration methods are very effective, that no excess damage is done to donor colonies, and that once outplanted, the corals behave like wild colonies. Stephanie Schopmeyer, a coral biologist at the University of…

Read More
Biology Education Science Policy 

The “Google Manifesto”: Bad Biology, Ignorance of Evolutionary Processes, and Privilege

By Agustin Fuentes, PhD, University of Notre Dame There are biological differences between the sexes, including average body size and upper body strength, and aspects of reproductive physiology. There is also a range of gendered differences in behavior and perception as contemporary societies structure developmental patterns and expectations differently for boys and girls. But there are more biological similarities than differences, and more gender overlaps than discontinuities, between males and females—we are the same species after all. These differences and similarities can, and do, play roles in shaping performance on specific tasks by individuals…

Read More
Do Wandering Bees Help Spread Disease? Animals Biology 

Do Wandering Bees Help Spread Disease?

By Emily Rhode @riseandsci Given the continued growth of the human population, it’s no surprise that our behaviors impact plants and animals. But what might be alarming are the ways we harm these species. Habitat loss and pesticide use have been shown to have devastating effects on pollinator populations worldwide, but researchers from the University of Toronto have found a new and unexpected way that humans are killing off bumblebees. And according to their study, the potential for bee deaths will only get worse as our demand for pollinated crops…

Read More
error: