Underwater Gardening: Coral Reefs and Aquaculture Animals Citizen Science Environment Oceanography 

Underwater Gardening: Coral Reefs and Aquaculture

By Shayna Keyles Twitter @shaynakeyles Instagram @shaynakeyles Our oceans are home to most of the world’s biodiversity, and 25 percent of its diversity thrives in coral reefs—that’s about two million species that call the reefs their home. But as reefs suffer the effects of climate change and globalization (several Caribbean reef-building species are now considered endangered), their ecosystems suffer, too. Fish colonies that provide food for coastal communities dry up, and the natural barriers that the reefs create become less effective, leading to more destruction in the wake of tropical…

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Citizen Science Education 

SciGirls Offers Real STEM Role Models for Young Girls

By Shayna Keyles Twitter @shaynakeyles Instagram @shaynakeyles As a young girl, I loved watching Bill Nye’s experiments, Steve Irwin’s expeditions, and Michio Kaku’s explanations of the universe. These men made science look cool and exciting. But they also reinforced the idea that science was less accessible for girls like me, who weren’t physically fit enough to be an astronaut or confident enough with numbers to be a theoretical physicist. The closest thing I had to a female scientist role model was Ms. Frizzle from The Magic School Bus, but the…

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From California to New Jersey and points in between, friends of GotScience Magazine showed support for science in their I “heart” Science T-shirts from Science Connected. Photos contributed. Citizen Science Science Policy 

Marching On: Science for the People

By Shayna Keyles Twitter @shaynakeyles Instagram @shaynakeyles Tens of thousands descended on state and country capitals on Earth Day to march for science, and I was one of them. I joined up with fellow science lovers in San Francisco, where carbon-based comrades waved permanent-marker protest signs at each other in acknowledgment and wore T-shirts emblazoned with puns or allegiances to research organizations and educational associations. Some even wore lab coats, and one man was spotted wearing a spacesuit and helmet from NASA. People all had their own reasons for marching, but…

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Citizen Science Science Policy 

Many Ways to March for Science

Cathy Seiler: Why I March for Science The March for Science is this Saturday, April 22. Thousands—perhaps hundreds of thousands—of scientists and supporters of science will take to the streets in Washington, DC, and more than 500 cities in satellite marches around the globe. I will be participating in Bend, Oregon.  Why do I march? I march because science is incredible. How cool is it that scientists are working on curing HIV/AIDS with cord blood transplants? How cool is it that science has increased the length and quality of our…

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Learning Curve: Engaging in Science Communication Animals Citizen Science Photos 

Learning Curve: Engaging in Science Communication

By Steven Spence @TheStevenSpence “In its encounter with Nature, science invariably elicits a sense of reverence and awe. The very act of understanding is a celebration of joining, merging, even if on a very modest scale, with the magnificence of the Cosmos.” —Carl Sagan Curiosity takes you places How in the world did I wind up in science communication, as a contributor to GotScience.org? Curiosity and a determination to share original work on social media. Some years ago, I was bored with what I saw on Facebook. It seemed like…

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Wildlife Game of Thrones: Wolf versus Crow Animals Citizen Science Photos 

Wildlife Game of Thrones: Wolf versus Crow

By Steven Spence @TheStevenSpence “Through the bleak and early morn, Where a stronger will is sworn, Where the moments move so slow, And seem to never let you go.” —Excerpt, “The Wolves and the Ravens” by Rogue Valley The wolves and the crows Recently I took advantage of some lovely winter weather to visit the wolves at Wildpark Bad Mergentheim in Germany. While there I mostly used my telephoto lens to get close-ups. I briefly switched lenses to get some wider views of the context—trees covered in frost; the wolf…

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Animals Citizen Science Environment 

Osprey: Bird of Many Names

By Steven Spence guān guān jū  jiū           ‘Fair, fair,’ cry the ospreys 关   关   雎 鸠 zài  hé zhī zhōu            On the island in the river. 在  河 之 洲 (Opening lines of the famous Chinese poem 关雎 Guān jū  [1]) A Bird of Many Names Depending on where you live, the bird pictured here may be called an osprey, a fish hawk, a river hawk, a sea hawk, or even a fish eagle! To avoid such confusion, scientists use one name, usually derived from Latin, to describe each species.…

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Biology Citizen Science Environment 

Strengthening the Endangered Species Act

By Neha Jain @lifesciexplore Have you ever heard of the Ōlulu plant? What about the vernal pool tadpole shrimp or Fender’s blue butterfly? These are the lesser known species among the almost 1,600 currently listed in the Endangered Species Act (ESA) that require long-term intervention strategies to ensure their survival. Despite numerous success stories, it is becoming more difficult to recover species. The ESA is beset by persistent and pervasive threats to species, pressures from climate change, uneven distribution of funding among species, and a rapidly growing list of species…

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Women in STEM Careers, Women in Action Citizen Science Engineering Videos 

Women in STEM Careers, Women in Action

By Chantal Brine GotScience.Org has partnered with Techsploration to bring you the Women in Action video series featuring women working in STEM careers. In this, the first video of many, meet hydrogeologist Nora Donald and learn about the important work she does. Techsploration’s Women In Action series delivers a quick overview of over forty careers in sciences, technology, trades, and engineering. The series features short clips of various female role models who share “the best thing” about their careers. The series introduces young women to careers in which females have…

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Spectacular view of the Perseid Meteor Shower over the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (Image credit ESO) Astronomy Citizen Science 

Perseid Meteor Shower 2015 and More

By Steve Beyer August’s main sky event promises to be our annual encounter with the tenuous trail of debris left in solar orbit by comet 109/P Swift-Tuttle. As Earth plows through this veil of mostly small grains and dust, we can see comet fragments appear as swift light traces of Perseid meteors. View the Perseid Meteor Shower 2015 The Perseid Meteor Shower is the night of August 12th and 13th. It peaks for viewers in the eastern United States during predawn hours of Thursday August 13 and the show should be better…

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