Biology Education Opinion 

A Day in the Life of a Vascular Biologist

By Noeline Subramaniam (@spicy_scientist) A vascular biologist studies blood vessels. Blood vessels connect all of our organs and tissues in our body to each other; as such, they play a crucial role in helping to maintain homeostasis—in other words, keeping the balance within our body. They have several important functions including transporting nutrients and removing waste, sensing blood flow, playing a role in the immune system, and much more. The two major types of blood vessels are arteries and veins. Arteries travel away from the heart and veins return to the…

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Citizen Science Promotes Environmental Engagement Citizen Science Education 

Citizen Science: An Important Tool for Researchers

By Shayna Keyles (@shaynakeyles). If you have been following GotScience.org for a while, you have probably seen the term citizen science, but you may still be unfamiliar with what that means. Consider this article a bit of Citizen Science 101. Citizen science describes a collaborative scientific process in which non-scientists, or citizen scientists, collaborate with scientists, who are trained professionals, often with a postgraduate degree, employed in a scientific field. Citizen scientists may have received science education or have participated in research, but they are not employed as scientists. Citizen…

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Science with Sophie: Scabs, scab Education Health Videos 

Science with Sophie: Scab Science

Scab Science It’s happened to all of us. You’re running or riding your bike, you slip, you fall, and you skin your knee. After a few days, you notice that the cut where you skinned your knee has formed a scab. What happens to our bodies when we get hurt? Why do we get cuts, and why do we get scabs afterward? Learn how white blood cells, proteins, and skin cells work together to help you get better after you get hurt in this episode of Science with Sophie! Do…

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Neoteny: Why do Disney princesses look like babies? Biology Education Science & Art Videos 

Neoteny: Why Disney Princesses Look Like Babies

Neoteny, Evolution, and Disney Our friend Dr. Joe Hanson from It’s Okay to Be Smart (PBS Digital Studios) goes full science nerd on neoteny, Disney princesses, and evolution. I noticed something weird about Disney Princesses lately. Naturally, I had to examine it through the lens of science. The answer led me to new knowledge about human development, the domestication and taming of animals, and why we find things cute in the first place. You’ll never look at cartoons the same way again. –Joe Hanson, PhD Twitter: @DrJoeHanson @okaytobesmart Instagram: @DrJoeHanson…

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Science with Sophie: Bubble Gum Chemistry Education Videos 

Science with Sophie: Bubble Gum

Bubble Gum Science Have you ever had gum stuck in your hair? Swallowed your gum? Found a wad of chewed gum stuck to the bottom of your shoe? If these things make you wonder what bubble gum really is and how it works, then you might be a scientist, and this video is for you. Do the science experiment with Sophie To do the bubble gum science experiment, you’ll need these things: 3 sticks of gum 1 freezer Go get those things and start the video! About Science With Sophie…

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Science with Sophie: Tears and Snot: Why do we make tears? Biology Chemistry Education Videos 

Science with Sophie: Tears and Snot

To do the science experiment with Sophie, you’ll need: Borax (find it in the laundry aisle of a grocery store) Water Equal parts clear school glue and water (for example, 1 cup glue and 1 cup water) Food coloring 2 bowls 1 Spoon Your hands   About Science With Sophie Science With Sophie is an interactive science comedy series for all ages. This fast-paced show invites viewers to explore science all around them and remember that they are brave, curious, funny, smart scientists every day. Hosted by science educator/actor/comedian Sophie…

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Education Physics Videos 

Science with Sophie: Potholes!

About Science With Sophie Science With Sophie is an interactive science comedy series for all ages. This fast-paced show invites viewers to explore science all around them and remember that they are brave, curious, funny, smart scientists every day. Hosted by science educator/actor/comedian Sophie Shrand, the cast of wacky characters – all played by Sophie – educate and entertain while showcasing how diverse careers in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) can be. The series is Sophie’s upbeat solution to the serious problem of inequity in STEM fields and underrepresentation…

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How Do People Interact with Closed Nature Trails? Citizen Science Education Environment 

How Do People Interact with Closed Nature Trails?

by Maggie Gaddis In the first quarter of 2018, I worked with the Rocky Mountain Field Institute (RMFI) staff to identify trails of monitoring interest. We reflected on the feedback received in 2017. The Citizen Science Program concept was received well at the end of 2017,  and we agreed to expand the Program by including more trails. All trails are in the Garden of the Gods in 2018. The potential for additional sites is there, but we agreed it was best to focus our attention on the Garden. A question…

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Students Explore Oceans, Wetlands with Interactive Games Biology Education Environment 

Students Explore Oceans, Wetlands with Interactive Games

By Shayna Keyles @shaynakeyles One of the best ways for students to learn about biodiversity is through hands-on experience. Of course, teachers can take their kids to the local pond to learn how different aquatic species interact, but what if students could learn about any aquatic environment, such as the oceans, or even the Everglades? That’s where iBiome, an interactive app by our friends at Springbay Studio, comes in handy. The series of downloadable games helps students develop scientific skills by creating observable, virtual biodomes in a variety of environments.…

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Cooking, Evolution, and Brain Growth Anthropology Education 

Cooking, Evolution, and Brain Growth

Cooking establishes the difference between animals and people. In fact, we’re not the only social animals that sit down to eat together, but we are the only ones who cook. But how is cooking linked to human brain’s growth and evolution? This is a video from Dr. Joe Hanson’s It’s Okay To Be Smart series. Cooking helped humans strengthen social bonds and cooperation. Although our brain uses one-fifth of the calories that we eat, we spend only 5 percent of our daily lives eating, while Chimpanzees and Gorillas spend more than half…

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