Astronomy Photos Physics Science & Art 

Photographing the Northern Lights in Iceland

By Steven Spence (@TheStevenSpence) For night’s swift dragons cut the clouds full fast, And yonder shines Aurora’s harbinger; At whose approach, ghosts, wandering here and there, Troop home to churchyards. — Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream Curtains of Light Across the Sky Seeing the northern lights (aurora borealis) has long been on my bucket list. In March 2018 I was fortunate enough to have a break, allowing me to travel solo for some weeks. I headed to Iceland (also on my bucket list), hoping to catch not only the northern…

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Neoteny: Why do Disney princesses look like babies? Biology Education Science & Art Videos 

Neoteny: Why Disney Princesses Look Like Babies

Neoteny, Evolution, and Disney Our friend Dr. Joe Hanson from It’s Okay to Be Smart (PBS Digital Studios) goes full science nerd on neoteny, Disney princesses, and evolution. I noticed something weird about Disney Princesses lately. Naturally, I had to examine it through the lens of science. The answer led me to new knowledge about human development, the domestication and taming of animals, and why we find things cute in the first place. You’ll never look at cartoons the same way again. –Joe Hanson, PhD Twitter: @DrJoeHanson @okaytobesmart Instagram: @DrJoeHanson…

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The Art of Scientific Illustration Animals Paleontology Science & Art 

The Art of Scientific Illustration

By Shayna Keyles Twitter @shaynakeyles Instagram @shaynakeyles Scientific illustration is more than just cool artwork. It’s a way of conveying technical detail that other tools can’t provide; of capturing the complexities of organisms or fabrications that are too small, too far away, too extinct, or too difficult to dissect; of sharing intimate research in a globally understood language. Pictures of discovery Illustrations have always been used to track observations and inform others. There are drawings of animals in the Chauvet-Pont-d’Arc caves in France that date back 30,000 years and are…

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STEAM: Adding the Art to Science Science & Art 

STEAM: Adding the Art to Science

By Cathy Seiler @cyc55 What comes to mind when you envision science? A scientist looking through a microscope? A pipette slurping up liquid from a tube? A whole bunch of equations on a blackboard? These snapshots often depict science in the news or in movies, but what really brings science alive is the image at the other end of the microscope, the structure of proteins in that test tube, or the physical problem being modeled with those equations. This is where the art comes in. People have been drawing or…

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ancient bird wing preserved in amber Paleontology Science & Art 

Amber Preserves Details of Ancient Bird Wings

By Emily Willoughby @eawilloughby I am a paleoartist—a scientific illustrator whose job is to combine paleontological research with inference, logic, and a healthy dose of creativity to produce illustrations of long-extinct organisms. We are uniquely tasked with translating research into representations of real creatures that the public can see and experience as animals that lived and breathed, rather than as movie monsters or collections of measurements and static bones. This is no easy task. Accuracy always takes precedence, and the rendering must closely conform to the glimpse of reality granted…

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Dinosaur Dromaeosaurus by David Alden Paleontology Science & Art 

Dromaeosaurus: Dinosaur Brought to Life in Colorful Sculpture

By Shayna Keyles  @shaynakeyles David Alden is a sculptor who, in his latest project, combines his enthusiasm for paleontology and fine arts. Over the past two years he worked with a team to create a gorgeous life-sized sculpture of Dromaeosaurus albertensis, a dinosaur that lived during the Late Cretaceous period in what became the western United States and Alberta, Canada. I spoke with Alden about his motivations for undertaking such a project, how to fact-check a sculpture, and what’s next on the horizon. GotScience: What first inspired you to do…

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Yosemite Half Dome, Max Goldberg 2016 Photos Science & Art 

Yosemite, Half Dome in Photos

By Max Goldberg @GoldbergISD When you think of Yosemite, Half Dome probably comes to mind (it’s on the park logo, after all). So, as part of our family trip to Yosemite, I had to see it. Coincidentally, Half Dome was visible almost all the time during the three days we were there, giving us multiple-angle views of the unique rock formation. After a four-hour drive from San Francisco, we got our first view of Half Dome at an overlook called Tunnel View. Some people say that Tunnel View is the best…

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photographing snowflakes Photos Science & Art 

Photographing Snowflakes: Sky Crystals

By Don Komarechka  Snow: We love it and hate it. I’d rather not count the number of rushed mornings that become panicked when I realize I need to dig out from underneath a heavy blanket of frozen frustration. By the trillions, snowflakes are definitely a nuisance, but one at a time they can be one of the most beautiful and curious subjects I have ever photographed. There are a few simple rules—and a few complex ones—that govern how a snowflake grows. The easiest way to understand the shape of a…

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Painting the Way to the Moon Astronomy Science & Art 

Painting the Way to the Moon: An Impressionist Portrayal of a Rocket Scientist

By Dan Spengler Ed Belbruno is a self-admitted motormouth. Painting the Way to the Moon, a new documentary about the mathematician and painter who previously worked for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), does not prove him wrong—it mostly features Belbruno talking about himself. Painting the Way to the Moon takes its title from Belbruno’s experience of finding inspiration for a ballistic capture trajectory to the moon in a painting he made, but ultimately struggles to find a clear identity. Belbruno tells most of his own backstory, with brief comments from…

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Photos Science & Art 

Alaska Wildlife Photography: Behind the Scenes

Hello! My name is Max Goldberg, and you may have seen multiple stories and photos of my adventures in Alaska last summer. As you read, you may be wondering, “How did he get those pictures? They have to be fake. Also, how do I get to Alaska? What gear do you recommend?” Before we get into all that, I should give you a little background. First, you simply cannot just get up and go to wild Alaska, unprepared. Not only dangerous, but incredibly stupid. During the entire trip, my father and I…

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