The Art of Scientific Illustration Animals Paleontology Science & Art 

Dakotaraptor: Giant Raptor Straight Out of Hell Creek

By Emily Willoughby For centuries, dinosaurs have captured the public’s imagination through their massive proportions and power, and their ancestral connection to birds has more recently brought a new fascination to paleontology. But when a newly discovered dinosaur is both huge and covered in feathers, it becomes the stuff of legend—a true dragon shaped by evolution instead of mythos. Meet Dakotaraptor steini, one of the largest “raptor” dinosaurs known to science. This 17-foot-long predator was described by Robert DePalma, curator of vertebrate paleontology at the Palm Beach Museum of Natural…

Read More
Sexism in gaming; games industry Science & Art Technology 

Another Look at Sexism in the Games Industry

Our partners at ResearchGate have interviewed two scientists about sexism and social dynamics in the gaming industry. These are their findings. Half of the 150 million gamers in the USA are now women. But instead of embracing the changing demographic, the massive growth in the number of women playing games is only making the gaming industry’s sexism and exclusion more apparent. We speak with Rachel Kowert and Johannes Breuer  authors of “Sexist Games=Sexist Gamers?” about the gaming industry, Tomb Raider and the issue of sexism. ResearchGate: What is your opinion of…

Read More
Time Travel: The DeLorean Time Machine Science & Art 

Back to the Future and Time Travel Science

ResearchGate Back to the Future’s Marty McFly lived the dream: he traveled back in time, forward in time, and rode hover boards. To celebrate his imminent arrival – October 21st 2015 is the date he and Doc travel to in the second movie – we highlight the studies that show scientists are as heavily hooked on time travel as we are… Mental time travel: Pat yourself on the back because you’ve already time traveled a million times over. Researchers have long-considered our ability to re-experience the past (memory) and pre-experience…

Read More
lunar eclipse 1, Max Goldberg Astronomy Photos Science & Art 

Total Lunar Eclipse of the Heart

By Max Goldberg The lunar eclipse is something a person can see only a few times in a lifetime. Luckily enough for me, I was able to see it this Sunday night, in Ames Iowa, at Iowa State University. Even though I live on campus, this was not just a “walk out of my dorm and shoot it” kind of project. Saturday night, I spent a solid hour researching and planning where I would need to be at what time in order to get the shots I wanted. T-2HR 30MIN…

Read More
Sunsets: Sunset seen at the coast in Novigrad, Croatia. Thin clouds turn a normal sunset into a sci-fi worthy sunset. [EOS 7DmkII: 400mm, f5.6, ISO 100, 1/2000 sec] Photos Science & Art 

Sunsets are Illusions

By Steven Spence “It is sometimes said that scientists are unromantic, that their passion to figure out robs the world of beauty and mystery. But is it not stirring to understand how the world actually works — that white light is made of colors, that color is the way we perceive the wavelengths of light,[…] and that the sky is blue for the same reason that the sunset is red? It does no harm to the romance of the sunset to know a little bit about it.” (Carl Sagan, Pale…

Read More
Kirigami-inspired solar cell courtesy of Lamoureux A et al. Physics Science & Art Technology 

New Solar Cells Inspired by 400-year-old Art

By Jonathan Trinastic @jptrinastic Artists in  seventeenth century Japan probably never expected their unique paper-cutting artwork, known as kirigami, to inspire leading-edge technology four hundred years later.  But the traditional art and new science have been recently well-paired to improve renewable energy technology, according to a recent paper1 in Nature Communications that details a creative design for a lightweight solar cell that tracks the Sun’s position throughout the day. Kirigami is the art of cutting paper to create elaborately textured, three-dimensional works of art.  Kirigami artists generally begin by cutting…

Read More
bear catching salmon in Alaska Animals Science & Art 

Photographer’s Adventures with Grizzly Bears

Article and Photos by Max Goldberg  After an eight-hour plane ride from Chicago, and a day to get over the jet lag, the first stop for my father and I on our week-and-a-half trip to Alaska was Brooks Lodge. Brooks Lodge is a camp in the heart of the Katmai National Park, and it is famous for two things: fishing and bears. Upon getting off the float plane that got us to the Lodge, we were briefed on the area, the grizzly bears, and the basics of surviving an encounter…

Read More
Diaphonization work of Sadie Stednitz (Photography ©Chad Lowe) Biology Science & Art 

The Artful Science of Diaphonization

By Ansel Oommen Ansel is a freelance writer, multimedia artist, and citizen scientist residing in New York City. He writes in-depth pieces about the intersection of science and art. The dead fish, frogs, and snakes floating in the vials are like curiosities from the Victorian era. But unlike the stuffed and mounted animals of taxidermy, these specimens are transparent, offering a literal window into their skeletal structure. The rich reds, purples, and blues that highlight their bones and cartilage have been produced by the process of diaphonization, which blends art and…

Read More
The author’s all-time favorite image of the Aurora (Photo courtesy of Antti Pietikainen, www.theaurorazone.com) Astronomy Science & Art 

Aurora Borealis: Myths, Legends, Science

By Alistair McLean Alistair McLean is the Managing Director of The Aurora Zone, a company that specializes in holidays searching for the Northern Lights. He has seen the aurora borealis more times than he can count and never fails to be enthralled by its beauty. In the late 1980’s, a group of musicians calling themselves 10,000 Maniacs penned a song called “Planned Obsolescence.” The lyrics suggested that modern advances in science and technology will render “mysticism obsolete.” I am reminded of this song pretty much every time I stand beneath…

Read More
Arborsculpture: Nagold Cube (Copyright Ludwig.Schönle) Environment Science & Art 

Arborsculpture: Artful Science of Tree Shaping

By Ansel Oommen Our Earth is hungry for solutions. From climate change and deforestation to overpopulation and pollution, our lives are ever dependent on our delicate dealings with the environment. But amongst the grassroots we are seeing a resurgence of an ancient practice of combining art and science, humanity and nature, to deliver an innovative contemporary response: Arborsculpture. A Brief History of Tree Shaping Dating as far back as the sixteenth century, tree shaping has been hinted at in paintings and literature, but it was not until Axel Erlandson, the…

Read More