Biology Education Science Policy 

The “Google Manifesto”: Bad Biology, Ignorance of Evolutionary Processes, and Privilege

By Agustin Fuentes, PhD, University of Notre Dame There are biological differences between the sexes, including average body size and upper body strength, and aspects of reproductive physiology. There is also a range of gendered differences in behavior and perception as contemporary societies structure developmental patterns and expectations differently for boys and girls. But there are more biological similarities than differences, and more gender overlaps than discontinuities, between males and females—we are the same species after all. These differences and similarities can, and do, play roles in shaping performance on specific tasks by individuals…

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Science Policy Challenges, Part Four: Information Overload Science Policy Technology 

Science Policy Challenges, Part Four: Information Overload

By Jonathan Trinastic @jptrinastic This is the fourth in a series of four articles by Dr. Jonathan Trinastic in our new Science Policy section. In 2002, human civilization duplicated or recorded 23 exabytes of data (that’s 23 followed by 18 zeros, or 23 billion gigabytes). That may sound like a lot, but fast-forward to 2017, and we are manipulating this much data in just one week. The amount of information at our fingertips is staggering, whether it be about Stephen Curry’s clutch 3-point field goal percentage at home against winning…

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Biology Health Science Policy 

Science Policy Challenges, Part Three: The Aging Brain

By Jonathan Trinastic @jptrinastic This is the third in a series of four articles by Dr. Jonathan Trinastic in our new Science Policy section. In 2014, 46.2 million people over the age of 65 lived in the United States. By 2060, this number will skyrocket to around 98 million, increasing the percentage of older adults from 14 to 22 percent. As our population becomes older on average, later-life diseases will strike with more frequency. By 2025, more than seven million Americans will likely suffer from Alzheimer’s disease, a specific type…

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power grid, science policy, energy Physics Science Policy Technology 

Science Policy Challenges, Part Two: A Strained Grid

By Jonathan Trinastic @jptrinastic This is the second in a series of four articles by Dr. Jonathan Trinastic in our new Science Policy section. Just over a year ago, over 230,000 Ukrainians lost connection to their country’s electricity grid after hackers took control of computers and shut down regional substations. The attack had been planned for months, likely by an experienced and well-funded team. Such an organized assault could soon be seen somewhere in the United States. “Everything about this attack was repeatable in the United States,” said Robert Lee,…

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Public Health Fictions: An Interview with Miriam Doyle Health Science Policy 

Public Health Fictions: An Interview with Miriam Doyle

By Kate Stone @GotScienceOrg Miriam Doyle is a public health professional and one of an estimated forty thousand people who participated in the 2017 March for Science in Washington, DC. GotScience: What motivated you to make that sign? Miriam Doyle: Back in 2015, the Center for Medical Progress released manipulative and fraudulent videos about Planned Parenthood. The public uproar over the idea of Planned Parenthood profiting from the illegal sale of “baby parts” had no factual basis, but the impact was still significant. Congress formed the Select Investigative Panel on…

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Science Policy 

Scientists, Please Describe Your Failures

We don’t ask people in other professions to put their failures on display, but it’s vital for speeding up progress in crucial areas of research from climate change to medicine and public health. By Ijad Madisch Ask any budding director if they would like to see the first iterations of Francis Ford Coppola’s Godfather. I don’t think many would pass up the opportunity to see Coppola’s process from filming, to editing, to deciding what makes the final cut.  Indeed, people in nearly any occupation, from painters to journalists to architects…

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From California to New Jersey and points in between, friends of GotScience Magazine showed support for science in their I “heart” Science T-shirts from Science Connected. Photos contributed. Citizen Science Science Policy 

Marching On: Science for the People

By Shayna Keyles Twitter @shaynakeyles Instagram @shaynakeyles Tens of thousands descended on state and country capitals on Earth Day to march for science, and I was one of them. I joined up with fellow science lovers in San Francisco, where carbon-based comrades waved permanent-marker protest signs at each other in acknowledgment and wore T-shirts emblazoned with puns or allegiances to research organizations and educational associations. Some even wore lab coats, and one man was spotted wearing a spacesuit and helmet from NASA. People all had their own reasons for marching, but…

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Science Policy 

Photos: March for Science San Francisco

March with Science Connected and GotScience team members joined large crowds of fellow scientists at March for Science events across the United States, from Washington, DC, to San Francisco, CA.  Additionally, our friends and allies in the gaming community hosted a virtual event called Gaming for Science in San Bruno, CA. They live-streamed and raised funds for equal-access science education and women in STEM. Enjoy our photo gallery from the San Francisco March for Science.

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Citizen Science Science Policy 

Many Ways to March for Science

Cathy Seiler: Why I March for Science The March for Science is this Saturday, April 22. Thousands—perhaps hundreds of thousands—of scientists and supporters of science will take to the streets in Washington, DC, and more than 500 cities in satellite marches around the globe. I will be participating in Bend, Oregon.  Why do I march? I march because science is incredible. How cool is it that scientists are working on curing HIV/AIDS with cord blood transplants? How cool is it that science has increased the length and quality of our…

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Scientists and Social Media Science Policy Technology 

Scientists and Social Media

By Kate Stone @GotScienceOrg Dr. Bill Sullivan is a Showalter Professor of Pharmacology, Toxicology, Microbiology, and Immunology at the Indiana University School of Medicine. That’s an impressive job title, but it’s not his only one. Bill is also a blogger. Social media is an efficient way for research scientists to connect with the public at large. Scientists have tools at their disposal to reach out to millions of people, involve citizen scientists in projects, and collaborate with colleagues. Yet social media use is often stigmatized. Since Bill actively uses social…

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