Fabulous Fat: Lipid-Based Nutrient Supplements Combat Malnutrition Health 

Fabulous Fat: Lipid-Based Nutrient Supplements Combat Malnutrition

By Shayna Keyles @shaynakeyles Malnutrition affects hundreds of millions of children around the world. As of 2017, about 23 percent of children under five suffer from stunted growth because of malnutrition and about 8 percent experience extreme wasting, which is characterized by a low weight-to-height ratio. Although over the years many treatments have been developed that reduce chances of mortality, increase weight gain, and improve lean tissue creation—all signs of healthy development—more work is necessary to create an inexpensive, accessible, and long-term solution. Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF; also known as…

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Biology Education Science Policy 

The “Google Manifesto”: Bad Biology, Ignorance of Evolutionary Processes, and Privilege

By Agustin Fuentes, PhD, University of Notre Dame There are biological differences between the sexes, including average body size and upper body strength, and aspects of reproductive physiology. There is also a range of gendered differences in behavior and perception as contemporary societies structure developmental patterns and expectations differently for boys and girls. But there are more biological similarities than differences, and more gender overlaps than discontinuities, between males and females—we are the same species after all. These differences and similarities can, and do, play roles in shaping performance on specific tasks by individuals…

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Spinach and Siderophores: The Bacterial Battle for Iron Biology Health 

Spinach and Siderophores: The Bacterial Battle for Iron

By Ada Hagan @adahagan Many remember the boisterous, muscle-bound, tattooed sailor Popeye and the thin-as-a-rail Olive Oyl from Saturday morning cartoons. In times of need, such as when his rival Bluto abducted Olive Oyl for the 50th time, Popeye would squeeze open a tin can of spinach. Eating the spinach, sometimes miraculously through his corn-cob pipe, gave Popeye that extra boost of energy needed to escape his bonds and rescue Olive Oyl. What was so special about spinach that gave Popeye his superpower? Iron. Or so I thought. It’s popularly…

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GotScience Book Review Animals Biology Book Reviews 

Book Review: Wild Sex: The Science Behind Mating in the Animal Kingdom

Title: Wild Sex: The Science Behind Mating in the Animal Kingdom Reviewed by: Kate Stone for GotScience.org, a Science Connected publication Author: Dr. Carin Bondar Publisher: Pegasus Books On sale: Now (September 2016) Best for: 18 and up Reviewer’s rating: 4.5 out of 5 Introduction Sexual reproduction. It provides the genetic diversity that is essential for complex life on Earth. Birds do it; bees do it—every member of the animal kingdom does it, from fruit flies to blue whales. But if you think humans have a tough time dating, try…

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Life Cycle of a Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly Animals Biology Photos 

Life Cycle of a Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly

By Yvi San Google+ The pipevine swallowtail butterfly, Battus philenor, is a relatively small black swallowtail with gorgeous, iridescent blue scaling. It measures approximately 7–10 cm (2.75–4 in) from tip of wing to tip of wing. It is commonly found in the Deep South, but during the summer you can find it in the Southwest, including parts of California, and from Kansas to New York. Last year I planted woolly Dutchman’s pipevine, Aristolochia tomentosa, to attract this butterfly to my garden. I was rewarded at the beginning of summer with…

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Pathogenic Triggers of Bacterial DNA Discovered Biology Health 

Pathogenic Triggers of Bacterial DNA Discovered

By Shayna Keyles @shaynakeyles Bacteria, those mysterious, microscopic creatures living in, on, and around us, are very often our benign neighbors with whom we quietly cohabitate and occasionally exchange mutual support. However, as anyone who has ever gotten pneumonia or strep throat knows, bacteria are not always looking out for our best interests. Occasionally, bacteria become pathogenic and infect their hosts, and if we are their hosts, we get sick. In a groundbreaking study published on July 29 in Science Access, researchers from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory uncovered the molecular…

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Bumblebees: A bumblebee covered in tiny body hairs. University of Bristol Biology 

Bumblebee Hairs Detect Floral Electric Fields

It is well known that bees dance to tell each other where to find the best flowers, but have you ever wondered how bees find the flowers in the first place? A new study suggests that each bumblebee has tiny hairs that vibrate in response to electrical signals transmitted by flowers. It’s been known for a while that flowers communicate with pollinators, such as bumblebees, by sending out electric signals. However, scientists have been wondering how the bees detect those floral messages. The Hair of the Bumblebee Researchers at the University…

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ivy Biology 

Ivy League Climber

By Mark Lasbury, MS, MSEd, PhD @Biologuy1 Wrigley Field is the venerable 1914 baseball stadium on Chicago’s north side. One of its most characteristic features is the ivy-covered outfield wall that occasionally swallows a hit ball, never to be seen again—a ground rule double. The vines on the outfield wall at Wrigley Field are actually Boston ivy and Japanese bittersweet. English Ivy would have a tough time with Chicago winters, just like everyone else. English ivy (Hedera helix) is an evergreen climbing vine in the Araliaceae family, but it will…

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Laugh: Marc Kjerland Biology Videos 

Why Do We Laugh?

Laughing is a universal human behavior, one that transcends borders of language and culture. But it’s also REALLY WEIRD. Why do we do it? The answer has less to do with humor than you might think, and more to do withs socializing, bonding, and biology. Laugh Hard, Laugh Often This video from It’s OK to Be Smart and PBS Digital Studios is written and hosted by Dr. Joe Hanson, Ph.D. Special thanks to Dr. Joe for granting permission to publish his videos on GotScience.org. Joe Hanson – Creator/Host/Writer Joe Nicolosi –…

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biobank Biology 

What Is a Biobank?

By Cathy Seiler, PhD What is a biobank? And why do scientists collect human tissue for research? To understand what biobanks are and why they exist, it is helpful to first understand what type of “currency” is stored in the “banks” and what this “currency” can purchase. The currency in biobanks are biological specimens (sometimes shortened to “biospecimens” or just “specimens”), and these biospecimens are used to “purchase” knowledge through scientific research or preservation. Biospecimens can be any type of biological sample or material. Seed biobanks, such as the Svalbard Global…

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