Biology Education Opinion 

A Day in the Life of a Vascular Biologist

By Noeline Subramaniam (@spicy_scientist) A vascular biologist studies blood vessels. Blood vessels connect all of our organs and tissues in our body to each other; as such, they play a crucial role in helping to maintain homeostasis—in other words, keeping the balance within our body. They have several important functions including transporting nutrients and removing waste, sensing blood flow, playing a role in the immune system, and much more. The two major types of blood vessels are arteries and veins. Arteries travel away from the heart and veins return to the…

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Reusable Lab on a Chip Costs One Cent Health Technology 

Reusable Lab on a Chip Costs One Cent

By Neha Jain @lifesciexplore Scientists have developed a reusable lab on a chip (LOC) that can be printed using an inkjet printer at an unprecedented cost of one cent. This biochip has the potential to revolutionize health care in developing countries by allowing for the early diagnosis and treatment of diseases such as HIV, malaria, tuberculosis, and cancer. Using small samples, the LOC platform can be used to rapidly detect such diseases by isolating and characterizing rare cells and molecules. Poor access to early diagnostic equipment results in increased breast…

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STEAM: Adding the Art to Science Science & Art 

STEAM: Adding the Art to Science

By Cathy Seiler @cyc55 What comes to mind when you envision science? A scientist looking through a microscope? A pipette slurping up liquid from a tube? A whole bunch of equations on a blackboard? These snapshots often depict science in the news or in movies, but what really brings science alive is the image at the other end of the microscope, the structure of proteins in that test tube, or the physical problem being modeled with those equations. This is where the art comes in. People have been drawing or…

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Nuclear magnetic resonance: External view of the Synchrotron SOLEIL in Paris. Biology Health Physics 

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: A Dynamic View of Life

By Florian Celli Florian Celli is a PhD student of biophysics in the Center for Atomic Energy (CEA of Saclay) and the Synchrotron SOLEIL in Paris. He uses nuclear magnetic resonance to study protein dynamics in order to understand their biological role. He co-writes 2 Steps From Science, a website of general science in French and English for students and science fans. Follow on Twitter and Facebook. I am going to talk about architecture, but I am not an architect. I am going to talk about movement, but I am not a dancer. As a…

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