Biology Botany 

Plants Communicate with Neighbors in Response to Touch

By Radhika Desikan How well do you and your neighbour know each other? Chances are, very little these days. But some living things, including plants, know their neighbours well. According to new research, it appears that what one plant “feels” can also be sensed by its neighbouring plant. Isn’t that remarkable? It is a fact of life that plants do not move from one place to another. Therefore plants, unlike humans, cannot move away from any impending danger, be it a herbivore, a disease-causing microbe, or even the cold and…

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Viruses Are Talking, and It’s All About Peer Pressure Biology 

Viruses Are Talking, and It’s All About Peer Pressure

By Marie Davey @biophilesblog For everything from blue whales to bacteria, communication is an essential part of life. Living organisms use an astonishing array of methods to signal one another: sounds, scents, touch, vibrations, and color. Lightning bugs signal in the night to attract mates, gorillas bellow to establish their territory, plants release hormones to signal insect attacks, and honeybees dance to tell their hive mates where the best flower patches are. Communication is essential for organisms trying to attract a mate, signal threats, identify kin, and coordinate collective behavior.…

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University of Vermont scientists Peter Dodds and Chris Danforth led a new Big Data study confirming that humans use more happy words than sad words. Uncategorized 

Preference for Positive, Happy Words

In 1969, two psychologists at the University of Illinois proposed what they called the Pollyanna Hypothesis–the idea that there is a universal human tendency to use positive, happy words more frequently than negative ones. “Humans tend to look on (and talk about) the bright side of life,” they wrote. That speculation has provoked debate ever since. Now, scientists at the University of Vermont have gathered a data set of billions of words to support the 1960s theory. People Use More Happy Words Than Sad Words The researchers collected samples of ten…

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