Desert Dust Increases Harmful Marine Bacteria Biology Environment Oceanography 

Desert Dust Increases Harmful Marine Bacteria

By Emily Rhode, @riseandsci A new study out of the University of Georgia could help predict blooms of a common but deadly type of marine bacteria and change the way we view some the planet’s most important environmental processes. The genus Vibrio includes the bacteria that cause cholera. It can also cause gastroenteritis from shellfish consumption and wound infections from seawater in humans, as well as diseases in marine organisms. Dubbed “opportunitrophs,” the bacteria are known for their ability to reproduce and adapt to changes quickly. “Part of what makes these…

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Deep Sea Creatures: Angler Fish Animals Oceanography Videos 

Eight Incredible Deep Sea Creatures

By Joe Hanson We know more about some other planets than we do about the deepest corners of Earth’s oceans, and the species we’ve found there are almost alien. Here’s some of the most unbelievable deep sea creatures ever observed! Special thanks to the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) for help with this video! Twitter/Periscope: @jtotheizzoe @okaytobesmart Snapchat: YoDrJoe Instagram: @jtotheizzoe Facebook: facebook.com/itsokaytobesmart Whale illustrations by Nobu Tamura/CC-BY-3.0 Joe Hanson – Creator/Host/Writer Joe Nicolosi – Director Amanda Fox – Producer, Spotzen IncKate Eads – Producer Andrew Matthews – Editing/Motion Graphics/Animation…

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Marine Biologist Maxine Westhead Biology Oceanography 

What Does a Marine Biologist Do?

Our friends over at Techsploration in Canada inspire people to make the world a better place with science. That’s why they’ve produced this short video about marine biologist Maxine Westhead. In it, she explains how and why she became a marine biologist, and what she loves most about her work. Are you passionate about protecting marine life, but unsure of how to make that passion into a career? See how Maxine’s work as a marine biologist is making a difference to protect our precious oceans and the creatures that live in them,…

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Photo of coral (Courtesy of Public.Resource.Org via Flickr) Animals Environment 

Copying Coral to Contain Heavy Metal Pollution

By Jonathan Trinastic @jptrinastic Copying Coral to Contain Heavy Metal Pollution Coral’s characteristically colorful tentacles, while attracting tourists and SCUBA divers with their unique beauty, are both the animal’s greatest strength and weakness. Although these structures have evolved to efficiently absorb nutrients from the water, they also let in toxic heavy metals like mercury, lead, or cadmium, which industrial manufacturers are pouring into the oceans in increasing quantities. However, scientists may have found a way to reduce heavy metal concentrations in oceans and prevent coral and other animals (including humans) from…

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Electric Blue Cichlid (Courtesy of Criminalatt) Animals Oceanography Videos 

Hey Cichlid, Check Out My Sandcastle

By Tom Evans (@AquaEvans)  Here is a healthy reminder that all those other fish in the sea aren’t so bad. I’d like to justify my belief that Lake Malawi cichlids are considerably more charming than most human companions. Before we go on, I am not encouraging you to leave your wife/husband and run to the nearest lake. Lake Malawi, also known as Lake Nyasa in Tanzania and Lago Niassa in Mozambique, is an African Great Lake. It is located between Malawi, Mozambique, and Tanzania. Cichlid Love Cichlids are charismatic lovers, and…

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Coelacanth, Shelf Life Episode 3, American Museum of Natural History Video Animals Biology Videos 

Fishing for Facts: Studying the Rare Coelacanth

Meet the Coelacanth Coelacanths (see-la-kanths) are large, ancient fish with arm-like fins and armor-like scales. They can be found in the fossil record through the time of the dinosaurs, but disappear about 70 million years ago. Everyone thought the creature was extinct. Then, in 1938, the coelacanth splashed into the modern world when one was caught in a fishing net off the coast of South Africa. The prehistoric specimen pulled from the fishing net was discovered by Marjorie Courtenay-Latimer, the curator of the East London Museum, located in South Africa.…

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Polar Bears: Tasul the polar bear (Oregon Zoo) Animals Biology Environment 

Polar Bears Struggling to Find Food

By Kate S. The polar bear is a fearsome hunter and, when it’s time to eat, there’s nothing it finds more satisfying than a hearty meal of ringed seal. But as the arctic sea ice melts, polar bears have fewer opportunities to hunt their traditional, lipid-rich prey. Among other animals, climate change has been impacting our shellfish supply, California’s pika population, and the lemurs of Madagascar. Now, a team of scientists led by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) found that polar bears, forced onto land by the loss of sea…

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Mantis Shrimp Animals Biology 

How the Mantis Shrimp Packs a Powerful Punch

The miniweight boxing title of the animal world belongs to the mantis shrimp, a cigar-sized crustacean with front claws that can deliver an explosive 60-mile-per-hour punch. The speed of a mantis shrimp’s strike has been compared to that of a bullet leaving the barrel of a gun. Now, a Duke University study of 80 million years of mantis shrimp evolution reveals how the animal’s fast weapons developed a dizzying array of shapes — from spiny and barbed spears to hatchets and hammers — while still managing to pack a characteristic…

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Oysters, clams, and mussels in Oregon and Washington are showing the effects of ocean acidification (Oregon State University) Environment Oceanography 

Ocean Acidification Threatens Shellfish

By Kate Stone Coastal communities in fifteen U.S. states that depend on the $1 billion shellfish industry (primarily oysters and clams) are in trouble. The shellfish supplies in these areas are at risk from the increasing threat of ocean acidification, according to a new study from Oregon State University. Previously, the Pacific Northwest was most frequently cited as the region with vulnerable shellfish populations, say the researchers. Now they have identified many more coastal areas where the problem exists, ranging from Chesapeake Bay to the bayous of Louisiana. “Ocean acidification…

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Bluefin Tuna at the Hopkins Marine Station, Monterey Bay Aquarium in California (©Monterey Bay Aquarium/Randy Wilder) Animals Biology Oceanography 

Tuna Stay Warm with Cold Hearts

The heart of a bluefin tuna keeps pumping during extreme temperature changes that would stop a human heart, according to a joint team of scientists from the University of Manchester and Stanford University. Pacific bluefin tuna are top predators renowned for their epic migrations across the Pacific Ocean. They are also unique amongst bony fish as they are warm bodied (endothermic) and can raise their core body temperature to 20°C above that of the surrounding water. They can also dive down into much colder water 1000 meters or more below…

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