Shortfin Mako Shark under Threat Animals Oceanography 

Shortfin Mako Shark under Threat

By Kate Stone The shortfin mako shark is the fastest shark in the world. Its top cruising speed has been recorded at 40 kilometers per hour (kph), or 25 mph, with bursts of up to 74 kph, or 46 mph. Because shortfin makos are so fast, collecting accurate data about them has been especially difficult. Fortunately, new real-time satellite tracking technology has enabled researchers to gather much more accurate information about these amazing sharks. Unfortunately, the data is shockingly grim: shortfin mako sharks are being killed in fisheries at a…

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By Brocken Inaglory - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2141765 Animals Oceanography Videos 

So Many Jellyfish, So Little Time

Dr. Joe gets up close and personal with the jellyfish (jellies) at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. “Jellyfish are mesmerizing and beautiful and I have no idea how they work. So I went behind the scenes at the Monterey Bay Aquarium with my new friend Tommy to learn all about them. I saw some things…” Dr. Joe says. Enjoy! Brought to you by It’s OK to be Smart, PBS Digital Studios, and BBC Earth Big Blue Live. Featured photo courtesy of By Brocken Inaglory – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2141765 GotScience.org translates complex…

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A grey whale with scars on its tail flukes, possibly the result of a collision with a marine vessel. Image credit: Ricardo Antunes. Animals Environment Oceanography 

Marine Wildlife Protection Meets Maritime Tracking

When marine mammals surface for air, they are frequently struck by seagoing vessels. In addition, with maritime transport accounting for approximately 90 percent of world trade, the noise made by all those ships may disrupt the navigation of whales and other marine mammals. Besides noise disturbance and fatal strikes, shipping impacts on marine wildlife include introduction of pathogens, fuel spills, and invasive species into the water; habitat destruction through anchoring, especially on coral reefs; and pollution of the air. The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), working with researchers and practitioners from public…

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Deep Sea Creatures: Angler Fish Animals Oceanography Videos 

Eight Incredible Deep Sea Creatures

By Joe Hanson We know more about some other planets than we do about the deepest corners of Earth’s oceans, and the species we’ve found there are almost alien. Here’s some of the most unbelievable deep sea creatures ever observed! Special thanks to the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) for help with this video! Twitter/Periscope: @jtotheizzoe @okaytobesmart Snapchat: YoDrJoe Instagram: @jtotheizzoe Facebook: facebook.com/itsokaytobesmart Whale illustrations by Nobu Tamura/CC-BY-3.0 Joe Hanson – Creator/Host/Writer Joe Nicolosi – Director Amanda Fox – Producer, Spotzen IncKate Eads – Producer Andrew Matthews – Editing/Motion Graphics/Animation…

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Green sea turtles swimming near North Stradbroke Island, Australia (Photos by Kathy Townsend) Animals Environment Oceanography 

Sea Turtles Poisoned by Plastic

By Kate Stone Mr. McGuire: I want to say one word to you. Just one word. Benjamin: Yes, sir. Mr. McGuire: Are you listening? Benjamin: Yes, I am. Mr. McGuire: Plastics. Benjamin: Exactly how do you mean? Mr. McGuire: There’s a great future in plastics. Think about it. Will you think about it? (The Graduate, 1967) An international study led by the University of Queensland has revealed that more than half the world’s sea turtles have ingested plastic and other rubbish. The study, led by Dr. Qamar Schuyler from UQ’s…

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coral reef Environment 

Recipe for the Perfect Coral Reef

By Tom Evans — @AquaEvans The latest health check on the world’s coral reefs wasn’t all doom and gloom; it’s shown us we have a plan for preservation that works. To understand how humans and corals can co-exist in perfect harmony, an honest assessment of our current relationship had to be done. Dr. Aaron McNeil and his team at the Australian Institute of Marine Science, gauged the health of 832 reefs from all over the world using a measure of biomass per hectare. Biomass is the total mass of organisms…

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Shellfish threatened by climate change: A mussel farm in South India (Photo courtesy of Lucy Turner) Environment Oceanography 

Will Climate Change Take Shellfish Off Menus?

Do you enjoy a tasty shrimp scampi, or perhaps some steamed mussels with lemon? How about a few oysters on the half shell? If so, you won’t be happy to hear that those and other shellfish dishes may soon be harder to come by. Climate change models are predicting rising sea temperatures around the world. In the tropics, rainfall is also predicted to increase, reducing the salt concentration of the surface layer of the sea. Together, these changes are expected to dramatically affect the world supply of seafood. Shellfish and…

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Isabela surfacing to breathe in the waters of Chile's Gulf of Corcovado (Courtesy of Rodrigo Hucke-Gaete/Blue Whale Center) Animals Oceanography 

Where Do Blue Whales Go to Breed?

By Kate S. The blue whale is the largest animal on Earth, yet the breeding grounds of this elusive creature have remained a mystery…until now. Scientists studying blue whales in the waters of Chile through DNA profiling and photo-identification may have solved the mystery of where these huge animals go to breed, according to a recent study by the Chile’s Blue Whale Center/Universidad Austral de Chile, The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS). The researchers have been tracking a female blue whale they call…

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Oceanography Animals Biology Featured Oceanography 

Jellyfish Do More than Drift

Jellyfish might look like they are just drifting along with the ocean currents, but according to a new study of barrel jellies, these animals are moving with purpose. Researchers have found that jellyfish can detect ocean currents and actively swim against them. “Jellyfish are not just bags of jelly drifting passively in the oceans,” says Graeme Hays of Deakin University in Australia. “They are incredibly advanced in their orientation abilities.” It is believed that this is how jellyfish are able to congregate in blooms consisting of hundreds to millions of…

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