How Do People Interact with Closed Nature Trails? Citizen Science Education Environment 

How Do People Interact with Closed Nature Trails?

by Maggie Gaddis In the first quarter of 2018, I worked with the Rocky Mountain Field Institute (RMFI) staff to identify trails of monitoring interest. We reflected on the feedback received in 2017. The Citizen Science Program concept was received well at the end of 2017,  and we agreed to expand the Program by including more trails. All trails are in the Garden of the Gods in 2018. The potential for additional sites is there, but we agreed it was best to focus our attention on the Garden. A question…

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Wildlife Game of Thrones: Wolf versus Crow Animals Citizen Science Photos 

Wildlife Game of Thrones: Wolf versus Crow

By Steven Spence @TheStevenSpence “Through the bleak and early morn, Where a stronger will is sworn, Where the moments move so slow, And seem to never let you go.” —Excerpt, “The Wolves and the Ravens” by Rogue Valley The wolves and the crows Recently I took advantage of some lovely winter weather to visit the wolves at Wildpark Bad Mergentheim in Germany. While there I mostly used my telephoto lens to get close-ups. I briefly switched lenses to get some wider views of the context—trees covered in frost; the wolf…

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Norwegian Sea Eagles Animals Photos 

Norwegian Sea Eagles

By Steven Spence @TheStevenSpence Two Names for One Eagle: Which Is Right? Scientifically known as Haliaeetus albicilla, these large raptors are commonly known as sea eagles or white-tailed eagles. “Sea eagle” is an accurate translation of the genus name, Haliaeetus, while “white-tailed” is accurate for the species name, albicilla. Since I saw these eagles in Norway, I shall refer to them as sea eagles, which is what the locals called them (Norwegian: Havørn). Where Do Sea Eagles Live? Sea eagles live in Eurasia and occupy a similar ecological niche as…

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Galapagos iguana. Frank Am Main Animals Biology Book Reviews Paleontology 

Book Review: Galapagos: Preserving Darwin’s Legacy

Reviewed by Steven Spence for GotScience.org, a Science Connected publication Title: Galapagos: Preserving Darwin’s legacy, Second Edition Author: Tui De Roy Publisher: Bloomsbury Natural History On sale: July 14, 2016, in the United States and Britain; August 1, 2016, in Australia and New Zealand Best for: General science audience, age 12 and up Reviewer’s Rating: 5 out of 5 Introduction Tui De Roy wrote the first edition of this book to commemorate the 50th anniversary in 2009 of the Charles Darwin Foundation’s establishment in the Galapagos Islands. The second edition updates multiple…

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photographing snowflakes Photos Science & Art 

Photographing Snowflakes: Sky Crystals

By Don Komarechka  Snow: We love it and hate it. I’d rather not count the number of rushed mornings that become panicked when I realize I need to dig out from underneath a heavy blanket of frozen frustration. By the trillions, snowflakes are definitely a nuisance, but one at a time they can be one of the most beautiful and curious subjects I have ever photographed. There are a few simple rules—and a few complex ones—that govern how a snowflake grows. The easiest way to understand the shape of a…

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Hummingbird by Steven Spence Animals Biology 

Amazing Hummingbirds: Dancing in the Air

By Steven Spence Dancing in the Air A hummingbird puts fixed-wing aircraft and helicopters to shame. Not only can it hover, it can also fly forward, backwards, sideways, and even upside down! During a mating display, the male Anna’s Hummingbird can accelerate up to 385 body lengths (g-force 10) per second during a dive. A Peregrine falcon dives at only 200 body lengths per second, and a Mig-25 fighter jet dives a mere 40 times its length. Hovering hummingbirds use a “figure 8” wing motion. Wind tunnel studies have shown…

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Crane fly, or mosquito eater (Pinzo via Wikimedia Commons)) Animals Biology Environment 

Do mosquito eaters eat mosquitos?

Have you seen many of these leggy insects hovering around your windows and doors lately? It’s none other than the humble, light-loving crane fly, also known as the mosquito eater. Have you ever seen a mosquito eater actually eat a mosquito? No? Well, that’s because that particular nickname is deceptive. Despite their colloquial moniker, crane flies do not prey on mosquitoes. And, contrary to popular misconception, they do not bite humans. In fact, adult crane flies have a very limited diet, feeding on nectar, or not feeding at all. Once…

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Declining bee populations: A honeybee drinking nectar, its reward for pollinating the flower Animals Environment Science & Art 

Declining Bee Populations Revisited

By Steven Spence Given mounting evidence of rapidly declining bee populations, what would be the impact if there were no more bees? As we have seen, there are many other pollinators, including bats and birds. Would these other pollinators be able to take over the job that bees do so well? Imagine A World Without Bees To a limited extent wind pollination (inefficient in most flowers) and other pollinators can compensate for a lack of bees. In other cases, bees are essential. For example, the commercial growth of almonds is almost…

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Pollinators: Honeybee visiting wildflowers Animals Environment Science & Art 

Pollination: Meet the Pollinators

By Steven Spence Spring is well underway in the northern hemisphere and EH Science is delighted to feature these seasonal photos by contributor, Steven Spence. We’re sure you’ll enjoy them as much as we do! Pollination Currently there is significant concern about the decline in honeybee populations. There are various factors behind the decimation of the hives, but first some fundamental questions: Why do plants require pollination? How important are bees in pollination? Are there alternative pollinators to bees? Pollinators Smell Sex and Candy in the Air Spring is a…

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Skull of the Olinguito: Shelf Life Episode 4 Animals Biology Videos 

Skull of the Olinguito: Shelf Life Episode 4

The Skull of the Olinguito This video, fourth in the Shelf Life series, reveals how scientists in the field found the skull of a new species and identified it as the elusive olinguito. Thousands of new animal species are discovered every year, some living and some extinct. Researchers regularly make expeditions to the far-flung corners of the globe in search of new species, ranging from the single-celled organisms found in pools of volcanic sulfur (or even in your own stomach), to deep-sea organisms and larger animals like monkeys and birds.…

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