Do Wandering Bees Help Spread Disease? Animals Biology 

Do Wandering Bees Help Spread Disease?

By Emily Rhode @riseandsci Given the continued growth of the human population, it’s no surprise that our behaviors impact plants and animals. But what might be alarming are the ways we harm these species. Habitat loss and pesticide use have been shown to have devastating effects on pollinator populations worldwide, but researchers from the University of Toronto have found a new and unexpected way that humans are killing off bumblebees. And according to their study, the potential for bee deaths will only get worse as our demand for pollinated crops…

Read More
Flower Power: The Physics of Pollination Biology Botany 

Flower Power: The Physics of Pollination

By Marie Davey @biophilesblog Pollination. The word brings to mind the droning buzz of fat yellow and black bumblebees bouncing from blossom to blossom in flower-decked meadows. But up close and in person, pollination is often anything but idyllic. The physical forces involved in pollination can be impressive, and both plants and insects must be well adapted to withstand them. The flowers of bunchberry (Cornus canadensis) generate impressive physical forces, acting as tiny pollen catapults. Bunchberry flower buds have petals that are fused to one another and completely enclose the…

Read More
Declining bee populations: A healthy honeybee visiting a backyard apple tree Animals Biology Environment 

Ten Fun Facts about Honeybees and Honey

Honeybees and Honey Honeybees do not exactly make honey. Instead, they improve the nectar produced by flowers. The honey we love to eat is nectar that bees have swallowed, regurgitated, and condensed for us (and for themselves). In the course of her lifetime, one healthy worker bee will produce 1/12th of a teaspoon of honey, without added environmental stress. The average American consumes about one pound of honey per year. That’s about 1 1/3 cups. To produce one pound of honey, the worker bees in a single hive collectively fly…

Read More
Declining bee populations: A honeybee drinking nectar, its reward for pollinating the flower Animals Environment Science & Art 

Declining Bee Populations Revisited

By Steven Spence Given mounting evidence of rapidly declining bee populations, what would be the impact if there were no more bees? As we have seen, there are many other pollinators, including bats and birds. Would these other pollinators be able to take over the job that bees do so well? Imagine A World Without Bees To a limited extent wind pollination (inefficient in most flowers) and other pollinators can compensate for a lack of bees. In other cases, bees are essential. For example, the commercial growth of almonds is almost…

Read More
Pollinators: Honeybee visiting wildflowers Animals Environment Science & Art 

Pollination: Meet the Pollinators

By Steven Spence Spring is well underway in the northern hemisphere and EH Science is delighted to feature these seasonal photos by contributor, Steven Spence. We’re sure you’ll enjoy them as much as we do! Pollination Currently there is significant concern about the decline in honeybee populations. There are various factors behind the decimation of the hives, but first some fundamental questions: Why do plants require pollination? How important are bees in pollination? Are there alternative pollinators to bees? Pollinators Smell Sex and Candy in the Air Spring is a…

Read More
error: