Science Policy 

Scientists, Please Describe Your Failures

We don’t ask people in other professions to put their failures on display, but it’s vital for speeding up progress in crucial areas of research from climate change to medicine and public health. By Ijad Madisch Ask any budding director if they would like to see the first iterations of Francis Ford Coppola’s Godfather. I don’t think many would pass up the opportunity to see Coppola’s process from filming, to editing, to deciding what makes the final cut.  Indeed, people in nearly any occupation, from painters to journalists to architects…

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Science Policy Challenges, Part One: A Rising Sea Science Policy 

Science Policy Challenges, Part One: A Rising Sea

By Jonathan Trinastic @jptrinastic This is the first in a series of four articles by Dr. Jonathan Trinastic in our new Science Policy section. Why science policy? Five minutes and 27 seconds. That’s the length of time that climate change was discussed across the three presidential debates of 2016, amounting to 2 percent of the total debate time. Although outrage over this scant time has quickly spread, it may be more surprising how little time is spent discussing science as a whole in presidential campaigns. Scientific progress is closely tied…

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GotScience Book Review Book Reviews Environment Technology 

Book Review: Science and the City

  Author: Laurie Winkless Publisher: Bloomsbury Sigma On sale: August 11, 2016 Best for: General audience, ages 13 and up Reviewed by: Jonathan Trinastic for GotScience.org, a Science Connected publication Reviewer’s rating: 4 out of 5 Introduction Cities are quickly becoming the beating hearts of civilization. The UN estimates that over half the global population now calls urban neighborhoods home. Packed with ever more mouths to feed, bodies to transport, and skyscrapers to heat or cool, cities demand the best of human creativity and productivity to meet the needs of…

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Galapagos iguana. Frank Am Main Animals Biology Book Reviews Paleontology 

Book Review: Galapagos: Preserving Darwin’s Legacy

Reviewed by Steven Spence for GotScience.org, a Science Connected publication Title: Galapagos: Preserving Darwin’s legacy, Second Edition Author: Tui De Roy Publisher: Bloomsbury Natural History On sale: July 14, 2016, in the United States and Britain; August 1, 2016, in Australia and New Zealand Best for: General science audience, age 12 and up Reviewer’s Rating: 5 out of 5 Introduction Tui De Roy wrote the first edition of this book to commemorate the 50th anniversary in 2009 of the Charles Darwin Foundation’s establishment in the Galapagos Islands. The second edition updates multiple…

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European laboratories open to visitors Astronomy Engineering Physics Technology 

Five European Laboratories Open to Visitors

Do you want to see science in action? Now, you can go deep inside some of the top research laboratories in Europe. Our friends at ResearchGate have produced this list of five recommendations for members of the public who want to go where the science happens. The following list includes some of the most amazing laboratories in Europe that are open to visitors. 1. Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire (CERN), France & Switzerland CERN is synonymous with the biggest questions in physics. What is the universe made of? What happened after the Big Bang?…

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Time Travel: The DeLorean Time Machine Science & Art 

Back to the Future and Time Travel Science

ResearchGate Back to the Future’s Marty McFly lived the dream: he traveled back in time, forward in time, and rode hover boards. To celebrate his imminent arrival – October 21st 2015 is the date he and Doc travel to in the second movie – we highlight the studies that show scientists are as heavily hooked on time travel as we are… Mental time travel: Pat yourself on the back because you’ve already time traveled a million times over. Researchers have long-considered our ability to re-experience the past (memory) and pre-experience…

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Theory vs. Hypothesis vs. Law… Explained! --Joe Hanson, Ph.D. Videos 

Theory vs. Hypothesis vs. Law… Explained!

Some people try to attack things like evolution by natural selection and man-made climate change by saying “Oh, that’s just a THEORY!” Yes, they are both theories. Stop saying it like it’s a bad thing! It’s time to learn the difference between a fact, a theory, a hypothesis, and a scientific law. Special thanks to Joe Hanson, Ph.D., for allowing us to publish his terrific videos. It’s Okay To Be Smart is written and hosted by Joe Hanson, Ph.D. @jtotheizzoe Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/itsokaytobesmart For more awesome science, check out: http://www.itsokaytobesmart.com Produced by PBS Digital…

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Marine Biologist Maxine Westhead Biology Oceanography 

What Does a Marine Biologist Do?

Our friends over at Techsploration in Canada inspire people to make the world a better place with science. That’s why they’ve produced this short video about marine biologist Maxine Westhead. In it, she explains how and why she became a marine biologist, and what she loves most about her work. Are you passionate about protecting marine life, but unsure of how to make that passion into a career? See how Maxine’s work as a marine biologist is making a difference to protect our precious oceans and the creatures that live in them,…

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Arborsculpture: Nagold Cube (Copyright Ludwig.Schönle) Environment Science & Art 

Arborsculpture: Artful Science of Tree Shaping

By Ansel Oommen Our Earth is hungry for solutions. From climate change and deforestation to overpopulation and pollution, our lives are ever dependent on our delicate dealings with the environment. But amongst the grassroots we are seeing a resurgence of an ancient practice of combining art and science, humanity and nature, to deliver an innovative contemporary response: Arborsculpture. A Brief History of Tree Shaping Dating as far back as the sixteenth century, tree shaping has been hinted at in paintings and literature, but it was not until Axel Erlandson, the…

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(stockimages via freedigitalphotos.net) Uncategorized 

Family Support Needed for Future Scientists

Family support makes all the difference in bringing up the next generation of scientists, engineers, and mathematicians, according to researchers at George Mason University. The researchers say that support from family is the primary factor in encouraging children to consider a future a science, with formal education playing a secondary role.  The findings could shape public policy and encourage community-centered activities designed to foster a love of science. “We were surprised to learn that the family is more important than we ever thought in terms of igniting the passion of…

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